Cavendoli Design – details of other knots and how to make them. basic clear details – macrame

Cavendoli Design – details of other knots and how to make them. basic clear details – macrameBasic Instructions
Step 1:
Fold and arrange the three retention cords
on the board vertically.
Pulling cables up and down
Have them too much tension and
Straight.
Mentally number the cables 1 – 6.
Secure 36-inch work cable to the left
Others, arranged horizontally.
Bring under
Hold cord 1 and
you want to rest the first node.
Designer’s
Tip: To create a straight line, press
You can place some masking tape on it.
board (horizontally or diagonally).
When tightening the nodes, make sure they are in contact.
edge of tape.
Step 2: Connect clockwise
Half Hitch by moving work cable
– Under lanyard number one.
When pulling the working tip
OK, over it
working cable
Tighten the Half Hitch.
Swipe up to relax against
pin.
Step 3: Repeat
Step 2, Connecting a second half
The first one is next to you, hitch.
Firmly tighten this knot when making.
Make sure the first one does not loosen.
steps
2 + 3 = One Vertical Half Hitch
Step 4: Move
working under last
holding cord 2.
Step 5: Repeat
Step 2, Vertical Halving
Secure Cord 2.
tighten, move knot back
previously very close to the knots
They tied.
Connect the second Half Link next to it
First, as you did in step 3.
Designer’s
Tip: The hardest part
This design ensures that the nodes stay close
together. Pull (or push)
hold the retention cord you use in a direction of retention
squeezing the previous node in both halves
Glitch.
Make sure each pair has the FIRST Half Binding
stays tight
creating and squeezing the second
Node.
Bringing macromeles of the 20th century here and now

I have to admit that until recently, the list of things I want to hang on my macrame walls will be at the end – when I grew up, it brought back memories of the moldy brown pieces I found in dozens of thrift stores. A particular macrame find – an owl made of twine – comes to mind. However, if you take the time to them, as proof that the flavors and trends have become a complete cycle (I’m betting the owl gets a nice penny in some old vintage boutiques right now) I’ve found myself with pleasure recently (not like that) Art.

Finally my example – my friend Jess recently bought the most beautiful wall hanging in Etsy (as you can see below) and it is full of neons to add a modern cool touch. After seeing this, I was desperate to know more about how these pieces were created – and I was very happy when Himo Art May agreed to stop running out. May did a great job of bringing the macro of the 20th century here and now (the last macromeles became perfect for me), and I was delighted that she decided to look at it – it turned out to be quite complicated – the process. It’s time to Improve your knotting skills, kids!

Things that you need:

  • Rope
  • Wooden Dowel
  • Wooden Breads
  • Paint Brush
  • Scissors
  • Masking Tape
  • Paint

 

1

It can attach dowels to the wall – it uses a removable hook, because it’s a great way to not make holes in the wall.

2

It can cut the rope into 14 x 4 yard pieces and 2 x 5 yard pieces. It then begins tying the rope to the head nodes of the larvae and compiling the dowel with 5 yard pieces (one at each end) into a book.

3

The rest can continue with ropes.

4

Then it makes double half axle knot.

5

And it goes on and on.

6

By the end, May begins tying them diagonally across the ropes.

7

You can add wooden beads here and here before connecting the nodes.

8

Then each starts to connect the switch nodes using 4 ropes.

9

Can connect 8 of them.

10

It then adds the node (as before) to the double half node.

11

And he brings them crosswise.

12

You can add more beads and bring the knots to the end.

13

It can then cut the ends of the rope.

14

Covers a portion of the dowel ends to paint and add a hint of neon (a woman from my own heart!)

15

Finally, he adds a watermelon pop to the end of the rope.

Great!

And there, hung a magnificent macrame wall. I can appreciate the work that goes into these pieces – not a craft for withered or ham!